Summer 2022 Quest 2 Courses

About UF

UF Quest invites students to consider why the world is the way it is and what they can do about it. Students examine questions that are difficult to answer and hard to ignore in a world that is swiftly changing and becoming increasingly more complex. In UF Quest 2, students draw upon the biological, physical or social and behavioral sciences to explore pressing questions about human societies and/or the planet.

The UF Quest 2 Requirement

Students who enter UF in or after Summer B 2021 are required take one Quest 2 course (either in their first or second year) to complete the UF Quest 2 requirement and to satisfy 3 credits of the General Education requirement in the Social and Behavioral Sciences, the Biological Sciences, or the Physical Sciences (see the UF Quest Requirement page for more information). Honors students are required to take an Honors Quest 2 course to complete the UF Quest 2 requirement. Some Quest 2 courses may also fulfill either the Diversity (D) or the International (N) requirement and/or count toward the Writing requirement. 

Quest 2 Courses

Click on the links below to learn more about the individual courses and to access course syllabi, which will be posted at least 3 days before the semester begins. Click the Campus, Honors, or UF Online button to filter by program or type in the search field to look for a particular subject, topic, instructor, etc.

For the day and periods that the classes meet, please consult the Schedule of Courses. A note is provided in One.UF for each Quest 1 and Quest 2 course so you can easily distinguish them.

Course Themes Culture Built Environment Literature Music Society Art Theater Dance
General Education Requirements Diversity International 2000 words 4000 words

Campus

IDS 2935: The Circular Nature of the COVID-19 Pandemic (Summer A)
  • Instructor: Sara Agnelli, One Health Center
  •  Gen Ed: Social and Behavioral Sciences, International  
  • Syllabus: The Circular Nature of the COVID-19 Pandemic
  • Description: Now that the COVID-19 pandemic has shaken the globe, how can we redesign a health eco-system less vulnerable and more sustainable for all: humans, animals, plants, and the environment? This course explores the COVID-19 pandemic from an interdisciplinary perspective. It is designed for undergraduate students, with diverse backgrounds and ambitions, who desire to better understand the complexity of the current pandemic and learn about tools for resilience, preparedness, and management as an investment for future global crises, particularly because of climate change. The following areas of study will be explored to address this pressing question: anthropology, religion, history, language, economic and sociological aspects, epidemiology, the human/animal interface and zoonotic diseases, public health, health behavior and healthcare systems. Crisis communication, the role of media including social media and the concept of an infodemic will be addressed with a particular focus around the issue of trust.
IDS 2935: The Next Pandemic (Summer B)
  • Instructor: Gabriela Hamerlinck, Geography
  •  Gen Ed: Biological Sciences, International  
  • Syllabus: The Next Pandemic
  • Description: Our semester focuses on historic and modern disease outbreaks, in order to hypothesize what the next pandemic will be. We will ask what social, political, biological, and environmental factors led to historic outbreaks, what happened when we faced a new pandemic, and how can we prepare for the next pandemic?

UF Online

IDS 2935: The Next Pandemic (Summer B)
  • Instructor: Gabriela Hamerlinck, Geography
  •  Gen Ed: Biological Sciences, International
  • Syllabus: The Next Pandemic- UF Online  
  • Description: Our semester focuses on historic and modern disease outbreaks, in order to hypothesize what the next pandemic will be. We will ask what social, political, biological, and environmental factors led to historic outbreaks, what happened when we faced a new pandemic, and how can we prepare for the next pandemic?
IDS 2935: The Circular Nature of the COVID-19 Pandemic (Summer A)
  • Instructor: Sara Agnelli, One Health Center
  •  Gen Ed: Social and Behavioral Sciences, International  
  • Syllabus: The Circular Nature of the COVID-19 Pandemic
  • Description: Now that the COVID-19 pandemic has shaken the globe, how can we redesign a health eco-system less vulnerable and more sustainable for all: humans, animals, plants, and the environment? This course explores the COVID-19 pandemic from an interdisciplinary perspective. It is designed for undergraduate students, with diverse backgrounds and ambitions, who desire to better understand the complexity of the current pandemic and learn about tools for resilience, preparedness, and management as an investment for future global crises, particularly because of climate change. The following areas of study will be explored to address this pressing question: anthropology, religion, history, language, economic and sociological aspects, epidemiology, the human/animal interface and zoonotic diseases, public health, health behavior and healthcare systems. Crisis communication, the role of media including social media and the concept of an infodemic will be addressed with a particular focus around the issue of trust.
IDS 2935: The Next Pandemic (Summer B)
  • Instructor: Gabriela Hamerlinck, Geography
  •  Gen Ed: Biological Sciences, International  
  • Syllabus: The Next Pandemic
  • Description: Our semester focuses on historic and modern disease outbreaks, in order to hypothesize what the next pandemic will be. We will ask what social, political, biological, and environmental factors led to historic outbreaks, what happened when we faced a new pandemic, and how can we prepare for the next pandemic?
IDS 2935: The Next Pandemic (Summer B)
  • Instructor: Gabriela Hamerlinck, Geography
  •  Gen Ed: Biological Sciences, International
  • Syllabus: The Next Pandemic- UF Online  
  • Description: Our semester focuses on historic and modern disease outbreaks, in order to hypothesize what the next pandemic will be. We will ask what social, political, biological, and environmental factors led to historic outbreaks, what happened when we faced a new pandemic, and how can we prepare for the next pandemic?