Fall 2022 Quest 1 Courses

About UF Quest

UF Quest invites students to consider why the world is the way it is and what they can do about it. Students examine questions that are difficult to answer and hard to ignore in a world that is swiftly changing and becoming increasingly more complex. What makes life worth living? What makes a society a fair one? How do we manage conflicts? Who are we in relation to other people or to the natural world?

The UF Quest 1 Requirement

Quest 1 courses fulfill the UF Quest 1 requirement and 3 credits of the General Education requirement in the Humanities (see the UF Quest Requirement page for more information). Honors students are required to take an Honors Quest 1 course to complete the UF Quest 1 requirement. Some Quest 1 courses may also fulfill either the Diversity (D) or the International (N) requirement and/or count toward the Writing requirement. 

Quest 1 Courses

Click on the links below to learn more about the individual courses and to access course syllabi, which will be posted at least 3 days before the semester begins. Click the Campus, Honors, or UF Online button to filter by program or type in the search field to look for a particular subject, topic, instructor, etc.

For the day and periods that the classes meet, please consult the Schedule of Courses. A note is provided in One.UF for each Quest 1 and Quest 2 course so you can easily distinguish them.

Course Themes Culture Built Environment Literature Music Society Art Theater Dance
General Education Requirements Diversity International 2000 words 4000 words

Campus

IDS 1161: What is the Good Life?
  • Format: Hybrid. Students are required to attend the weekly class meeting at the time and in the room specified in the Schedule of Courses. The other two contact hours are an online asynchronous lecture (or the equivalent) and an online asynchronous discussion.
  • Gen Ed: Humanities
  • Syllabus (Clark), Syllabus (Michel), Syllabus (Nichols)
  • Description: Drawing on the disciplines that make up the Humanities, this course investigates the very nature of the human condition. Students examine the ways different people from different societies across time conceptualize the good life, the meaning and value individuals ascribe to the lives that they live or want to live, and the choices, costs, and benefits of the good life.
IDS 2935: American Constitutionalism
  • InstructorPaul Gutierrez, Political Science
  • Format: 100% Classroom
  •  Gen Ed: Humanities
  • Syllabus
  • Description: How should we relate to the American Revolution, the U.S. Constitution, and the “Founding Fathers” today? Drawing on pedagogical practices from law, business, and graduate school, this course introduces students to competing accounts of the founding of the nation and the creation of its constitution.
IDS 2935: Art and the Global Citizen
  • Instructor: Bethany Taylor, Art and Art History
  • Format: 100% Classroom
  • Gen Ed: Humanities, International
  • Syllabus
  • Description: Introduces the role of contemporary art as an engaged interdisciplinary practice, capable of empowering students to think through some of society’s most pressing concerns, and to question and reinvigorate a social, civic, and political imagination.
IDS 2935: Atlantic Creoles
  • InstructorJames Essegbey and Benjamin Hebblethwaite, Languages, Literatures, and Cultures
  • Format: 100% Classroom
  • Gen Ed: Humanities, International,  2000 Words
  • Syllabus
  • This course takes a detailed look at four Atlantic creoles that developed through contact between Europeans and Africans, and the shaping of new identities and traditions. It provides historical and social contextualization of creole languages and cultures through, among others, literature, visual art, film, and songs.
    From ballet to Beyoncé, this course explores how dance and social identities, such as race and gender, impact each other. Students will explore social, concert, and popular dance in the U.S. and select global contexts. The course offers a variety of activities, including reading, viewing films, attending live/virtual performances, and participating in virtual movement workshops (no previous dance experience required). Assessments include discussion board posts, written essays, and qualitative exams.

IDS 2935: Becoming Black
  • Instructor: Abdoulaye Kane, Anthropology
  • Format: 100% Classroom
  • Gen Ed: Humanities, Diversity, 2000 Words
  • Syllabus
  • Description: Becoming black is an interdisciplinary class that explores the ways blackness and race, have been shaped and discussed by various thinkers, writers, filmmakers, and artists from the antiquity to the contemporary moment, across America, Europe and Africa.  
IDS 2935: Body, Self, World
  • Instructor: Meredith Farnum, Theatre and Dance
  • Format: 100% Classroom
  • Gen Ed: Humanities 
  • Syllabus
  • Description: This interdisciplinary Quest 1 course combines movement and philosophy merging practices in breathing, spatial awareness, coordination, and time-consciousness with the experience of embodiment and intention of movement that will offer students alternative ways of perceiving and engaging with the world through the lens of first-person subjectivity and intersubjectivity
IDS 2935: Cultural Animals
  • Instructor: Jonathan Rick, Philosophy
  • Format: 100% Classroom
  • Gen Ed: Humanities, 2000 words
  • Syllabus
  • Description: Humans are cultural animals. On the one hand, we are biologically evolved animals - members of nature’s kingdom, bound by its universal laws or norms.  On the other hand, we are creatures of culture, variably shaped by the influences and innovations of our particular societies and communities.  Given our dual citizenship within these domains, questions and challenges emerge regarding the boundaries and allegiances between human nature and human culture.  These limits are especially urgent with respect to understanding the contours and content of morality. In Cultural Animals, we will examine the interplay between the ‘natural’ and the ‘cultural’ aspects of our lives, with particular emphasis on exploring how these often-coordinating, yet potentially-competing, forces serve to shape our moral practices both within the human community and beyond the human community - specifically with respect to our interactions with and treatment of nonhuman animals.
IDS 2935: Dance, Race, Gender
  • InstructorRachel Carrico, Theater
  • Format: Hybrid
  • Gen Ed: Humanities, Diversity
  • Syllabus
  • Description: From ballet to Beyoncé, this course explores how dance and social identities, such as race and gender, impact each other. Students will explore social, concert, and popular dance in the U.S. and select global contexts. The course offers a variety of activities, including reading, viewing films, attending live/virtual performances, and participating in virtual movement workshops (no previous dance experience required). Assessments include discussion board posts, written essays, and qualitative exams.  
IDS 2935: Digital Literacy and the Humanities
  • InstructorSid Dobrin, English
  • Format: 100% Classroom
  • Gen Ed: Humanities, Diversity, 4000 words
  • Syllabus
  • Description: How does the digital affect how we live? How does the digital affect our quality of life, our ability to communicate with others, our ability live socially, civically, professionally, personally, and ethically?  Digital Literacy and the Humanities explores these questions and considers what it means to be digitally “literate.”

    https://vimeo.com/392739781

IDS 2935: Global Asia
  • Instructor: James Gerien-Chen, History
  • Format: 100% Classroom
  • Days and Periods: 14441 (M W 7, F 6); 14455 (M W 7, F 7); 14456 (M W 7, F 8)
  • Gen Ed: Humanites, International, 2000 Words
  • Syllabus
  • Description: This course traces the modern history and cultures of Asian migrations, from the seventeenth century to the present. Students will evaluate what a multidisciplinary approach to migration might contribute to current debates over migration and belonging, both in the United States and globally. In addition to offering an overview of large-scale patterns, the course encourages students to consider how these developments shaped individual lives and identities. To that end, students will engage with a broad range of historical sources, including autobiographies and memoirs, government reports, newspapers and other popular media, court cases, travel guides, and oral history interviews.
IDS 2935: Globalization Cities Cinema
  • Instructor: Vandana Baweja, Architecture
  • Format: 100% Classroom
  • Gen Ed: Humanities, International, 2000 Words
  • Syllabus
  • Description:This course examines how films depict globalization of cities from the point of the view of people who are disempowered through the power structures unleashed by global forces. Students will look at how theories of film, theories of globalization, intersect with urban and architectural histories.
IDS 2935: God, Humanity and Evolution
  • Instructor: Jonathan Edelmann, Religion
  • Format: Hybrid
  • Gen Ed: Humanities, 2000 Words
  • Syllabus
  • Description: This course examines the language that we use to talk about sciences and religions with a focus on Charles Darwin’s evolutionary theory. Through an examination of influential writings by scientists, philosophers, historians, and religious thinkers, this course shows the complex ways that evolutionary theory has been interpreted over time. It shows how the sciences have reshaped traditional religious views, the ways religion has reshaped the sciences, and the ways evolutionary theory impacts the portrayal of the future for natural and artificial intelligences. Students will have the opportunity to think and write about foundational concepts invigorated by the sciences and humanities. 
IDS 2935: Humans-Oil-Plants-Energy?
  • Instructor: Emily Hind, Spanish and Portuguese Studies, Katerie Gladdys, Art and Art History
  • Format: 100% Classroom
  • Gen Ed: Humanities, Diversity, 4000 Words
  • Syllabus
  • Description: This class looks at the different ways that the arts, humanities, and sciences think about plants and oil. Students will challenge their preconceived notions that categorize plants as Nature and oil as Culture. This complex vision for environmental justice questions the contradictions of sustainability goals such as forest lovers who reject an asphalt bike path, or asphalt lovers who favor only vista-opening palm trees. Through introspection and reflection on our dependence on plants and oil, students will hone their personal energy ethic and become newly conscious plant-based petrocitizens in times of climate change. Skateboards optional. Curiosity required.
IDS 2935: Idea of Happiness
  • InstructorNathan Rothschild, Philosophy
  • Format: 100% Classroom
  • Gen Ed: Humanities, 2000 Words
  • Syllabus
    Description: Every person wants to have a good life. But what is it to live well? This is a question about the nature of human happiness and well-being and how they may be achieved, and it was fundamental to Western philosophy at its inception. Socrates famously declared that the unexamined life is not worth living. In doing so, he was calling for a rigorous and theoretical investigation into our beliefs about what makes a life go well because he thought such an investigation was essential to our lives going well. But was he right? It is easy to say "yes," and be done with it. But do we really need to think deeply about what we care about in order to have a good life? 

    This Quest 1 course addresses the question that we cannot help but ask ourselves, “How should I live?”  Drawing primarily on the disciplines of Philosophy and Classics, in conjunction with close analysis of works of literature, drama, and film, this course will expose students to both historical and contemporary perspectives on well-being and happiness. The readings have been selected to represent a number of distinct perspectives, both philosophical and non-philosophical, and to help students think for themselves about the kind of lives they want to live. Students will be encouraged to find in historical texts material relevant to their own lives, not despite, but because of the fundamentally different assumptions and commitments that animate views which are thousands of years old. 

     

     

IDS 2935: Identity in American Buddhism
  • Instructor: Mario Poceski, Religion
  • Format: 100% Classroom
  • Gen Ed: Humanities, Diversity
  • Syllabus
  • Description: The focus of the course is on the key processes of identity formation as important factors in the making of American Buddhism, and the complex patterns of interaction among discrete identities. Students explore the historical events and central issues that continue to shape the growing presence of Buddhism as an integral part of America’s remarkably diverse religious and cultural landscapes, in relation to the ways individuals and communities fashion overlapping identities based on religious affiliation, race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, or nationhood.
IDS 2935: Is There Culture in Dance and Music?
  • Instructor: Augusto Soledade, Theatre, Kole Odutola, Literatures, Languages and Culture
  • Format: 100% Classroom
  • Gen Ed: Humanities, Diversity
  • Syllabus
  • Description: This course examines the concept of music and dance as living culture in Lagos, Nigeria and Bahia, Brazil, through the disciplines of dance, media and language studies, to create a background for students to place against their own cultural experiences and to understand how music and dance reflect cultural, social and political aspects of a society. Music and dance will be used as the lens through which we investigate our shared humanities and identities in hope to build empathy towards an appreciation of one another and to create a platform for constant self-reflection and self-awareness.
IDS 2935: Language and Emotion
  • Instructor: Ann Wehmeyer, Languages, Literatures and Cultures
  • Format: Online Asynchronous
  • Gen Ed: Humanities, Diversity, 2000 Words
  • Syllabus 
  • Description: We begin with a definition of emotion from neuroscience, then turn to the interface of emotion and language. We study vocal properties of emotion expression, how different languages conceptualize emotion, the ways in which those who are not neurotypical may differ in the expression of emotion, and how emotion expression in self-presentation can pose challenges in public spaces.
IDS 2935: Life Well Played
  • Instructor: Eamon OConner, Digital Worlds
  • Format: 100% Classroom
  • Gen Ed: Humanities, 4000 Words
  • Syllabus
  • Description: Examination of play and its aesthetic significance to contemporary digital cultures and broader society. 
IDS 2935: Musical Elements of Emotion
  • Instructor: Margaret Clifford, Arts in Medicine
  • Format: 100% Classroom
  • Gen Ed: Humanities, 2000 Words
  • Syllabus
  • Description: Students will investigate the theoretical and historical musical elements that elicit emotion. This course explores how music impacts the human experience by discussing theories of emotion, emotional intelligence, wellbeing, consumerism, and musical film scores. Students will observe their emotional responses to music and analyze the musical elements that elicited that response by actively listening to classical music compositions of various styles and genres. In addition, students will be required to attend one live music performance to investigate whether live musical performance enhances the emotional experience.
IDS 2935: Nature, Spirituality & Popular Culture
  • Instructor: Bron Taylor, Religion 
  • Format: Online Asynchronous
  •  Gen Ed: Humanities, International, 2000 words
  • Syllabus
  • Description: Examines the spiritual, ethical, and political dimensions of the arts (e.g. movies, music, photography), museums, theme parks, and other cultural productions, in which nature takes center stage. Moreover, we explore the international cultural tributaries, influences, and controversies such productions engender, for they constitute important ways that environmental ethics, and quests for environmentally sustainable livelihoods and lifeways.​
IDS 2935: Places and Spaces
  • Instructor: John Maze, Architecture
  • Format: 100% Classroom
  • Gen Ed: Humanities, International
  • Syllabus
  • Description:Examines how the spaces and places in the built environment around the world shape our lives and express who we are and who we want to be. Students will explore the campus and participate in creative class activities.
IDS 2935: Politics and Identity in Art
  • Instructor: Devin Harclerode, Art & Art History
  • Format: Hybrid (20068, 21122, and 21123), 100% synchronous online (26689, 26690, 26691)
  • Gen Ed: Humanites
  • Syllabus
  • Description: This course will use a multidisciplinary methodology to consider the place of identity in contemporary art. Through reading theoretical texts, looking at art, online studio visits with contemporary artists, and other assignments, we will consider how artists from a variety of subject positions (across race, class, gender, sexuality and ability) represent themselves and others.
IDS 2935: Politics of Race at UF
  • Instructor: Sharon Austin, Political Science
  • Format: 100% Online
  • Gen Ed: Humanities, Diversity, 4000 Words
  • Syllabus
  • Description: Before the admissions of the first Black, Hispanic/Latino, Asian, international, and other students of color, the University of Florida practiced an unyielding form of racism that excluded these students.  After it desegregated, these students often encountered a very hostile and unwelcoming environment.  This course will discuss race relations in both the past and present by examining the theories and methodologies in research articles and books.  It is a multi-disciplinary course that will appeal to students of all majors at UF.  The class will discuss essential questions, write papers, complete an experiential oral history activity, and receive information about current campus units that conduct research on racial issues. 

     

IDS 2935: Sounding the Alarm: Music and Social Engagement with the Environment
  • Instructor: Sarah Politz, Music
  • Format: 100% Classroom
  • Gen Ed: Humanities
  • Syllabus
  • Description: Sound is integral to the way we as humans engage with the world around us, from the soundworlds of animals and plants to those of human creativity and technology. In this course, we use music and sound as a way to understand the urgency of current issues in environmentalism and ecology. Using listening as an ethical practice, we will explore music from the popular to the experimental. We will seek to deepen our understanding of how we relate to the environment as ethical creatures and become more aware of the central place of sound and the environment in our lives. 
IDS 2935: The Anatomy of a Story
  • InstructorAlison Reynolds, University Writing Program
  • Format: 100% Classroom
  • Gen Ed: Humanities, Diversity, 2000 Words
  • Syllabus
  • Description: The humanities provide the link between the experiences of human life and science, and storytelling is fundamental to the human experience. Through storytelling we share our own experiences and hear the experiences of others, connecting to those who are like us and those who are very different. Storytelling, too, is fundamental to medicine as it tells of the intersections of illness, race, gender, and class. Many health professionals and patients share their stories to connect the practice with need to understand what it means to be sick. Ultimately, putting experiences into visual or textual forms is a means of expressing what it means to be “me” and capturing the experiences of being human. In this course, rather than learning the anatomy of a body, we will learn the anatomy of stories about medicine in film, literature, non-fiction, poetry, and art.
IDS 2935: The Horror, The Horror: Representations of War and Political Violence
  • InstructorEric Kligerman, Languages, Literatures and Cultures 
  • Fomat: 100% Classroom
  • Gen Ed: Humanities, International
  • Syllabus
  • Description: This course sets out to probe the cultural, social and political functions of horror in relation to shifting moments of historical violence. After reading and screening central works from the horror genre, we will examine some of the emblematic scenes of historical violence in the 20th and 21st centuries.
IDS 2935: The Posthuman Condition
  • Instructor: Anthony Manganaro, University Writing Program
  • Format: 100% Classroom
  • Gen Ed: Humanities, 2000 Words
  • Syllabus
  • Description: Humans evolve. And technology is rapidly changing what it means to be human. As we march towards smartphone dependence, AI ubiquity, human-enhancement technologies, and mind uploading, our species is approaching what some call a “posthuman” state. What are the possibilities and perils of a posthuman future, and how should we prepare for it? Many have stakes in this question: politicians, religious leaders, science fiction writers, physicians, filmmakers, and more. But so do you. Ultimately, you’ll consider this topic from multiple angles and will have the tools to communicate effectively about it. 
IDS 2935: War Games, United States & South Africa
  • Instructor: Mark Hodge, Art and Art History
  • Format: 100% Classroom
  • Gen Ed: Humanities, International
  • Syllabus
  • Description: Uses role-playing games to investigate conflict and its resolution by simulating the revolutionary chaos in New York (1775) and negotiations over a new constitution for post-apartheid South Africa (1993). Examines the role of the arts in remembering conflict, including Hamilton (2015), the Vietnam Veterans Memorial (1981), and contemporary monuments. We play two Reacting to the Past games where students are assigned a historically-based character and participate in a simulation of historical events and write papers in that role.
IDS 2935: Why Sports Matter
  • Instructor: Drew Brown, African American Studies
  • Format: 100% Classroom
  • Gen Ed: Humanities, Diversity, 2000 Words
  • Syllabus
  • Description: In 2016, Colin Kapernick, the former San Francisco 49’er quarterback took a knee to protest police brutality in the United States. His commitment to his beliefs, and not his declining athletic skills, ended his football career. This course examines the long history of professional and college athlete’s activism and its impact on American society. It challenges students to view sports not just as an escape from reality, but as an industry that reflects race, class, and gender inequities. For example, the National Football League’s commitment not to hire more African American head coaches.

    Sports are designed for all human beings to play, but in American society race, class, and gender plays a role in what racial or gender group are represented in a particular sport. Taking a historical/sociological approach this course challenges the notion that professional athletes are born, they are shaped by environment, race, gender, opportunity, class, and hard work.

IDS 2935: Writing Life: Art, Drama, Film, Literature, Poetry, and You
  • Instructor: Carolyn Kelley, University Writing Program
  • Format: 100% Classroom
  • Gen Ed: Humanities, Diversity, 2000 words 
  • Syllabus
  • Description: Humanities-based works of art (texts) reflect and resonate with components of personal, social, and cultural identities. These texts help us define who we are in terms of nationality, ethnicity, race, gender, class, sexual orientation, and ability and recognize who we are and how we live, behave, and connect with others. 

    In this discussion-based course, we study two novels, a short story, an album, and several poems, films, plays, and paintings. In order to demonstrate your understanding of the course and its goals, you will write three essays and sit for two closed-book exams.  

MUS 1610: Music and Spirituality
  • Instructor: Charles Pickeral, Music
  • Format: 100% Classroom
  • Gen Ed: Humanities, International 
  • Syllabus- AM; Syllabus- PM
  • Description: In this course, students will investigate some of the ways in which music and spiritual experiences have been interrelated throughout history and around the globe. Through an examination of diverse musical cultures, experiential learning, and individualized projects, we will explore the ways that music continues to promote and enhance some of the most profound human experiences.
THE 1431: Autobiography in Literature & Performance
  • Instructor: Manuel Simons, Theater and Dance
  • Format: 100% Classroom
  • Gen Ed: Humanities, Diversity, 2000 words
  • Syllabus
  • Description: The course explores the ways in which modern and contemporary American artists and writers have utilized self-examination as the basis for artistic creation.  Often merging the factual with the theatrical or dramatic, autobiographical performance and literature personalizes the values, incidents and relationships that shape human experience and give life meaning.

Honors

IDS 1161: What is the Good Life?
  • Format: Hybrid. Students are required to attend the weekly class meeting at the time and  in the room specified in the Schedule of Courses. The other two contact hours are an online asynchronous lecture (or the equivalent) and an online asynchronous discussion.
  • Class Numbers: 14409 and 14413
  • Gen Ed: Humanities
  • Honors: Yes
  • Syllabus (Clark)
  • Description: Drawing on the disciplines that make up the Humanities, this course investigates the very nature of the human condition. Students examine the ways different people from different societies across time conceptualize the good life, the meaning and value individuals ascribe to the lives that they live or want to live, and the choices, costs, and benefits of the good life.
IDS 2935: Artistic Revelation
  • Instructor: Thaddaeus Bourne, Music
  • Format: 100% Classroom
  • Gen Ed: Humanites
  • Syllabus
  • Description: What can great works of poetry and music teach us about ourselves: who we are, where we’ve come from, and where we’re going? Great works of art push boundaries. They are not only of their time, but continue to speak through the years. In this course, students will examine the world and themselves through the lens of poetry and music and use what they learn to help answer questions about how to think about the world, how to fit into it, and how to change it.
IDS 2935: European Experience
  • Instructor: Chrysostomos Kostopoulos, European Studies
  • Format: 100% Classroom
  • Gen Ed: Humanities, International, 2000 words
  • Syllabus
  • Description: The main goal of this course is to examine Europe and European Identity through a variety of multi-disciplinary approaches based on the arts and the humanities (including literature, film, music, and linguistics). 
IDS 2935: Secrets of Alchemy
  • Instructor:  Alexander Angerhofer, Chemistry
  • Format: 100% Classroom
  • Class Numbers: 20158 and 20168 
  • Days and Periods: TR 7, Lab T 11-E1 or W 11-E1
  • Gen Ed: Humanities
  • Honors: Yes
  • Syllabus
  • Description: Alchemy is the pre-cursor to modern chemistry. It grew out of observations and experiments of early
    practitioners who were biased by their own worldviews and religious convictions. The course will give
    an overview of the various historic phases of Alchemy: Greek, Arabic, Eastern, Latin, its revival in the
    early modern period, and its psychologized rebirth in the modern era. Alchemy was part of ‘natural
    philosophy’ during a time when there was no clear distinction between science and religion. The course
    explores the worldviews and religious biases of its practitioners. It explores the methodologies, both
    theoretical and practical, used by alchemists. It will show alchemy to be part of the wider human
    endeavor to understand the world around us and to utilize it to advance culture. The accompanying lab
    portion will allow students to ‘see through the eyes of the alchemist’ natural processes as they happen
    in the lab.
IDS 2935: Shelter Development
  • InstructorJason von Meding, Construction Management
  • Format: 100% Classroom
  • Gen Ed: Humanities, International 
  • Syllabus
  • Description: This course explores the ongoing human endeavor to satisfy the basic need for shelter, considering the impact of this endeavor on the natural environment and the variety of solutions that we see around the world. We reflect on what the future might look like under various climate change (and maldevelopment) scenarios, and confront the systemic oppression that underpins today’s housing problems.
IDS 2935: Time, Culture, and Identity
  • Instructor: Emily Bald, University Writing Program
  • Format: 100% Online
  • Gen Ed: Humanities, 2000 Words
  • Syllabus
  • Description: In this class, we explore different ways of conceptualizing and representing the experience of time. Drawing upon multidisciplinary perspectives—in history, cultural anthropology, religion, philosophy, literature, graphic narratives, film, art, and music—we analyze how enculturated understandings of time shape language, experience, and identity.

UF Online

IDS 1161: What is the Good Life?
  • Format: Online Asynchronous
  • Gen Ed: Humanities
  • Syllabus
  • Description: Drawing on the disciplines that make up the Humanities, this course investigates the very nature of the human condition. Students examine the ways different people from different societies across time conceptualize the good life, the meaning and value individuals ascribe to the lives that they live or want to live, and the choices, costs, and benefits of the good life.
IDS 2935: Dance, Race, Gender
  • InstructorRachel Carrico, Theater
  • Format: Online Synchronous
  • Gen Ed: Humanities, Diversity
  • Syllabus
  • Description: From ballet to Beyoncé, this course explores how dance and social identities, such as race and gender, impact each other. Students will explore social, concert, and popular dance in the U.S. and select global contexts. The course offers a variety of activities, including reading, viewing films, attending live/virtual performances, and participating in virtual movement workshops (no previous dance experience required). Assessments include discussion board posts, written essays, and qualitative exams.  
IDS 2935: God, Humanity and Evolution
  • Instructor: Jonathan Edelmann, Religion
  • Format: Hybrid
  • Gen Ed: Humanities, 2000 Words
  • Syllabus
  • Description: This course examines the language that we use to talk about sciences and religions with a focus on Charles Darwin’s evolutionary theory. Through an examination of influential writings by scientists, philosophers, historians, and religious thinkers, this course shows the complex ways that evolutionary theory has been interpreted over time. It shows how the sciences have reshaped traditional religious views, the ways religion has reshaped the sciences, and the ways evolutionary theory impacts the portrayal of the future for natural and artificial intelligences. Students will have the opportunity to think and write about foundational concepts invigorated by the sciences and humanities. 
IDS 2935: Language and Emotion
  • Instructor: Ann Wehmeyer, Languages, Literatures and Cultures
  • Format: Online Asynchronous
  • Gen Ed: Humanities, Diversity, 2000 Words 
  • Syllabus
  • Description: We begin with a definition of emotion from neuroscience, then turn to the interface of emotion and language. We study vocal properties of emotion expression, how different languages conceptualize emotion, the ways in which those who are not neurotypical may differ in the expression of emotion, and how emotion expression in self-presentation can pose challenges in public spaces.
IDS 2935: Nature, Spirituality & Popular Culture
  • Instructor: Bron Taylor, Religion 
  • Format: Online Asynchronous
  •  Gen Ed: Humanities, International
  • Syllabus
  • Description: Examines the spiritual, ethical, and political dimensions of the arts (e.g. movies, music, photography), museums, theme parks, and other cultural productions, in which nature takes center stage. Moreover, we explore the international cultural tributaries, influences, and controversies such productions engender, for they constitute important ways that environmental ethics, and quests for environmentally sustainable livelihoods and lifeways.​
IDS 2935: Politics of Race at UF
  • Instructor: Sharon Austin, Political Science
  • Format: Online Synchronous
  • Gen Ed: Humanities, Diversity, 4000 Words
  • Syllabus
  • Description: Before the admissions of the first Black, Hispanic/Latino, Asian, international, and other students of color, the University of Florida practiced an unyielding form of racism that excluded these students.  After it desegregated, these students often encountered a very hostile and unwelcoming environment.  This course will discuss race relations in both the past and present by examining the theories and methodologies in research articles and books.  It is a multi-disciplinary course that will appeal to students of all majors at UF.  The class will discuss essential questions, write papers, complete an experiential oral history activity, and receive information about current campus units that conduct research on racial issues. 
IDS 1161: What is the Good Life?
  • Format: Hybrid. Students are required to attend the weekly class meeting at the time and in the room specified in the Schedule of Courses. The other two contact hours are an online asynchronous lecture (or the equivalent) and an online asynchronous discussion.
  • Gen Ed: Humanities
  • Syllabus (Clark), Syllabus (Michel), Syllabus (Nichols)
  • Description: Drawing on the disciplines that make up the Humanities, this course investigates the very nature of the human condition. Students examine the ways different people from different societies across time conceptualize the good life, the meaning and value individuals ascribe to the lives that they live or want to live, and the choices, costs, and benefits of the good life.
IDS 1161: What is the Good Life?
  • Format: Hybrid. Students are required to attend the weekly class meeting at the time and  in the room specified in the Schedule of Courses. The other two contact hours are an online asynchronous lecture (or the equivalent) and an online asynchronous discussion.
  • Class Numbers: 14409 and 14413
  • Gen Ed: Humanities
  • Honors: Yes
  • Syllabus (Clark)
  • Description: Drawing on the disciplines that make up the Humanities, this course investigates the very nature of the human condition. Students examine the ways different people from different societies across time conceptualize the good life, the meaning and value individuals ascribe to the lives that they live or want to live, and the choices, costs, and benefits of the good life.
IDS 1161: What is the Good Life?
  • Format: Online Asynchronous
  • Gen Ed: Humanities
  • Syllabus
  • Description: Drawing on the disciplines that make up the Humanities, this course investigates the very nature of the human condition. Students examine the ways different people from different societies across time conceptualize the good life, the meaning and value individuals ascribe to the lives that they live or want to live, and the choices, costs, and benefits of the good life.
IDS 2935: Artistic Revelation
  • Instructor: Thaddaeus Bourne, Music
  • Format: 100% Classroom
  • Gen Ed: Humanites
  • Syllabus
  • Description: What can great works of poetry and music teach us about ourselves: who we are, where we’ve come from, and where we’re going? Great works of art push boundaries. They are not only of their time, but continue to speak through the years. In this course, students will examine the world and themselves through the lens of poetry and music and use what they learn to help answer questions about how to think about the world, how to fit into it, and how to change it.
IDS 2935: Musical Elements of Emotion
  • Instructor: Margaret Clifford, Arts in Medicine
  • Format: 100% Classroom
  • Gen Ed: Humanities, 2000 Words
  • Syllabus
  • Description: Students will investigate the theoretical and historical musical elements that elicit emotion. This course explores how music impacts the human experience by discussing theories of emotion, emotional intelligence, wellbeing, consumerism, and musical film scores. Students will observe their emotional responses to music and analyze the musical elements that elicited that response by actively listening to classical music compositions of various styles and genres. In addition, students will be required to attend one live music performance to investigate whether live musical performance enhances the emotional experience.
IDS 2935: Digital Literacy and the Humanities
  • InstructorSid Dobrin, English
  • Format: 100% Classroom
  • Gen Ed: Humanities, Diversity, 4000 words
  • Syllabus
  • Description: How does the digital affect how we live? How does the digital affect our quality of life, our ability to communicate with others, our ability live socially, civically, professionally, personally, and ethically?  Digital Literacy and the Humanities explores these questions and considers what it means to be digitally “literate.”

    https://vimeo.com/392739781

IDS 2935: Life Well Played
  • Instructor: Eamon OConner, Digital Worlds
  • Format: 100% Classroom
  • Gen Ed: Humanities, 4000 Words
  • Syllabus
  • Description: Examination of play and its aesthetic significance to contemporary digital cultures and broader society. 
MUS 1610: Music and Spirituality
  • Instructor: Charles Pickeral, Music
  • Format: 100% Classroom
  • Gen Ed: Humanities, International 
  • Syllabus- AM; Syllabus- PM
  • Description: In this course, students will investigate some of the ways in which music and spiritual experiences have been interrelated throughout history and around the globe. Through an examination of diverse musical cultures, experiential learning, and individualized projects, we will explore the ways that music continues to promote and enhance some of the most profound human experiences.
IDS 2935: Body, Self, World
  • Instructor: Meredith Farnum, Theatre and Dance
  • Format: 100% Classroom
  • Gen Ed: Humanities 
  • Syllabus
  • Description: This interdisciplinary Quest 1 course combines movement and philosophy merging practices in breathing, spatial awareness, coordination, and time-consciousness with the experience of embodiment and intention of movement that will offer students alternative ways of perceiving and engaging with the world through the lens of first-person subjectivity and intersubjectivity
IDS 2935: Idea of Happiness
  • InstructorNathan Rothschild, Philosophy
  • Format: 100% Classroom
  • Gen Ed: Humanities, 2000 Words
  • Syllabus
    Description: Every person wants to have a good life. But what is it to live well? This is a question about the nature of human happiness and well-being and how they may be achieved, and it was fundamental to Western philosophy at its inception. Socrates famously declared that the unexamined life is not worth living. In doing so, he was calling for a rigorous and theoretical investigation into our beliefs about what makes a life go well because he thought such an investigation was essential to our lives going well. But was he right? It is easy to say "yes," and be done with it. But do we really need to think deeply about what we care about in order to have a good life? 

    This Quest 1 course addresses the question that we cannot help but ask ourselves, “How should I live?”  Drawing primarily on the disciplines of Philosophy and Classics, in conjunction with close analysis of works of literature, drama, and film, this course will expose students to both historical and contemporary perspectives on well-being and happiness. The readings have been selected to represent a number of distinct perspectives, both philosophical and non-philosophical, and to help students think for themselves about the kind of lives they want to live. Students will be encouraged to find in historical texts material relevant to their own lives, not despite, but because of the fundamentally different assumptions and commitments that animate views which are thousands of years old. 

     

     

IDS 2935: Time, Culture, and Identity
  • Instructor: Emily Bald, University Writing Program
  • Format: 100% Online
  • Gen Ed: Humanities, 2000 Words
  • Syllabus
  • Description: In this class, we explore different ways of conceptualizing and representing the experience of time. Drawing upon multidisciplinary perspectives—in history, cultural anthropology, religion, philosophy, literature, graphic narratives, film, art, and music—we analyze how enculturated understandings of time shape language, experience, and identity.
IDS 2935: Globalization Cities Cinema
  • Instructor: Vandana Baweja, Architecture
  • Format: 100% Classroom
  • Gen Ed: Humanities, International, 2000 Words
  • Syllabus
  • Description:This course examines how films depict globalization of cities from the point of the view of people who are disempowered through the power structures unleashed by global forces. Students will look at how theories of film, theories of globalization, intersect with urban and architectural histories.
IDS 2935: Why Sports Matter
  • Instructor: Drew Brown, African American Studies
  • Format: 100% Classroom
  • Gen Ed: Humanities, Diversity, 2000 Words
  • Syllabus
  • Description: In 2016, Colin Kapernick, the former San Francisco 49’er quarterback took a knee to protest police brutality in the United States. His commitment to his beliefs, and not his declining athletic skills, ended his football career. This course examines the long history of professional and college athlete’s activism and its impact on American society. It challenges students to view sports not just as an escape from reality, but as an industry that reflects race, class, and gender inequities. For example, the National Football League’s commitment not to hire more African American head coaches.

    Sports are designed for all human beings to play, but in American society race, class, and gender plays a role in what racial or gender group are represented in a particular sport. Taking a historical/sociological approach this course challenges the notion that professional athletes are born, they are shaped by environment, race, gender, opportunity, class, and hard work.

IDS 2935: Politics and Identity in Art
  • Instructor: Devin Harclerode, Art & Art History
  • Format: Hybrid (20068, 21122, and 21123), 100% synchronous online (26689, 26690, 26691)
  • Gen Ed: Humanites
  • Syllabus
  • Description: This course will use a multidisciplinary methodology to consider the place of identity in contemporary art. Through reading theoretical texts, looking at art, online studio visits with contemporary artists, and other assignments, we will consider how artists from a variety of subject positions (across race, class, gender, sexuality and ability) represent themselves and others.
IDS 2935: Dance, Race, Gender
  • InstructorRachel Carrico, Theater
  • Format: Hybrid
  • Gen Ed: Humanities, Diversity
  • Syllabus
  • Description: From ballet to Beyoncé, this course explores how dance and social identities, such as race and gender, impact each other. Students will explore social, concert, and popular dance in the U.S. and select global contexts. The course offers a variety of activities, including reading, viewing films, attending live/virtual performances, and participating in virtual movement workshops (no previous dance experience required). Assessments include discussion board posts, written essays, and qualitative exams.  
IDS 2935: Dance, Race, Gender
  • InstructorRachel Carrico, Theater
  • Format: Online Synchronous
  • Gen Ed: Humanities, Diversity
  • Syllabus
  • Description: From ballet to Beyoncé, this course explores how dance and social identities, such as race and gender, impact each other. Students will explore social, concert, and popular dance in the U.S. and select global contexts. The course offers a variety of activities, including reading, viewing films, attending live/virtual performances, and participating in virtual movement workshops (no previous dance experience required). Assessments include discussion board posts, written essays, and qualitative exams.  
IDS 2935: Atlantic Creoles
  • InstructorJames Essegbey and Benjamin Hebblethwaite, Languages, Literatures, and Cultures
  • Format: 100% Classroom
  • Gen Ed: Humanities, International,  2000 Words
  • Syllabus
  • This course takes a detailed look at four Atlantic creoles that developed through contact between Europeans and Africans, and the shaping of new identities and traditions. It provides historical and social contextualization of creole languages and cultures through, among others, literature, visual art, film, and songs.
    From ballet to Beyoncé, this course explores how dance and social identities, such as race and gender, impact each other. Students will explore social, concert, and popular dance in the U.S. and select global contexts. The course offers a variety of activities, including reading, viewing films, attending live/virtual performances, and participating in virtual movement workshops (no previous dance experience required). Assessments include discussion board posts, written essays, and qualitative exams.

IDS 2935: Becoming Black
  • Instructor: Abdoulaye Kane, Anthropology
  • Format: 100% Classroom
  • Gen Ed: Humanities, Diversity, 2000 Words
  • Syllabus
  • Description: Becoming black is an interdisciplinary class that explores the ways blackness and race, have been shaped and discussed by various thinkers, writers, filmmakers, and artists from the antiquity to the contemporary moment, across America, Europe and Africa.  
IDS 2935: Writing Life: Art, Drama, Film, Literature, Poetry, and You
  • Instructor: Carolyn Kelley, University Writing Program
  • Format: 100% Classroom
  • Gen Ed: Humanities, Diversity, 2000 words 
  • Syllabus
  • Description: Humanities-based works of art (texts) reflect and resonate with components of personal, social, and cultural identities. These texts help us define who we are in terms of nationality, ethnicity, race, gender, class, sexual orientation, and ability and recognize who we are and how we live, behave, and connect with others. 

    In this discussion-based course, we study two novels, a short story, an album, and several poems, films, plays, and paintings. In order to demonstrate your understanding of the course and its goals, you will write three essays and sit for two closed-book exams.  

IDS 2935: European Experience
  • Instructor: Chrysostomos Kostopoulos, European Studies
  • Format: 100% Classroom
  • Gen Ed: Humanities, International, 2000 words
  • Syllabus
  • Description: The main goal of this course is to examine Europe and European Identity through a variety of multi-disciplinary approaches based on the arts and the humanities (including literature, film, music, and linguistics). 
IDS 2935: The Posthuman Condition
  • Instructor: Anthony Manganaro, University Writing Program
  • Format: 100% Classroom
  • Gen Ed: Humanities, 2000 Words
  • Syllabus
  • Description: Humans evolve. And technology is rapidly changing what it means to be human. As we march towards smartphone dependence, AI ubiquity, human-enhancement technologies, and mind uploading, our species is approaching what some call a “posthuman” state. What are the possibilities and perils of a posthuman future, and how should we prepare for it? Many have stakes in this question: politicians, religious leaders, science fiction writers, physicians, filmmakers, and more. But so do you. Ultimately, you’ll consider this topic from multiple angles and will have the tools to communicate effectively about it. 
IDS 2935: Identity in American Buddhism
  • Instructor: Mario Poceski, Religion
  • Format: 100% Classroom
  • Gen Ed: Humanities, Diversity
  • Syllabus
  • Description: The focus of the course is on the key processes of identity formation as important factors in the making of American Buddhism, and the complex patterns of interaction among discrete identities. Students explore the historical events and central issues that continue to shape the growing presence of Buddhism as an integral part of America’s remarkably diverse religious and cultural landscapes, in relation to the ways individuals and communities fashion overlapping identities based on religious affiliation, race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, or nationhood.
IDS 2935: The Anatomy of a Story
  • InstructorAlison Reynolds, University Writing Program
  • Format: 100% Classroom
  • Gen Ed: Humanities, Diversity, 2000 Words
  • Syllabus
  • Description: The humanities provide the link between the experiences of human life and science, and storytelling is fundamental to the human experience. Through storytelling we share our own experiences and hear the experiences of others, connecting to those who are like us and those who are very different. Storytelling, too, is fundamental to medicine as it tells of the intersections of illness, race, gender, and class. Many health professionals and patients share their stories to connect the practice with need to understand what it means to be sick. Ultimately, putting experiences into visual or textual forms is a means of expressing what it means to be “me” and capturing the experiences of being human. In this course, rather than learning the anatomy of a body, we will learn the anatomy of stories about medicine in film, literature, non-fiction, poetry, and art.
IDS 2935: Is There Culture in Dance and Music?
  • Instructor: Augusto Soledade, Theatre, Kole Odutola, Literatures, Languages and Culture
  • Format: 100% Classroom
  • Gen Ed: Humanities, Diversity
  • Syllabus
  • Description: This course examines the concept of music and dance as living culture in Lagos, Nigeria and Bahia, Brazil, through the disciplines of dance, media and language studies, to create a background for students to place against their own cultural experiences and to understand how music and dance reflect cultural, social and political aspects of a society. Music and dance will be used as the lens through which we investigate our shared humanities and identities in hope to build empathy towards an appreciation of one another and to create a platform for constant self-reflection and self-awareness.
IDS 2935: Language and Emotion
  • Instructor: Ann Wehmeyer, Languages, Literatures and Cultures
  • Format: Online Asynchronous
  • Gen Ed: Humanities, Diversity, 2000 Words
  • Syllabus 
  • Description: We begin with a definition of emotion from neuroscience, then turn to the interface of emotion and language. We study vocal properties of emotion expression, how different languages conceptualize emotion, the ways in which those who are not neurotypical may differ in the expression of emotion, and how emotion expression in self-presentation can pose challenges in public spaces.
IDS 2935: Language and Emotion
  • Instructor: Ann Wehmeyer, Languages, Literatures and Cultures
  • Format: Online Asynchronous
  • Gen Ed: Humanities, Diversity, 2000 Words 
  • Syllabus
  • Description: We begin with a definition of emotion from neuroscience, then turn to the interface of emotion and language. We study vocal properties of emotion expression, how different languages conceptualize emotion, the ways in which those who are not neurotypical may differ in the expression of emotion, and how emotion expression in self-presentation can pose challenges in public spaces.
IDS 2935: Politics of Race at UF
  • Instructor: Sharon Austin, Political Science
  • Format: 100% Online
  • Gen Ed: Humanities, Diversity, 4000 Words
  • Syllabus
  • Description: Before the admissions of the first Black, Hispanic/Latino, Asian, international, and other students of color, the University of Florida practiced an unyielding form of racism that excluded these students.  After it desegregated, these students often encountered a very hostile and unwelcoming environment.  This course will discuss race relations in both the past and present by examining the theories and methodologies in research articles and books.  It is a multi-disciplinary course that will appeal to students of all majors at UF.  The class will discuss essential questions, write papers, complete an experiential oral history activity, and receive information about current campus units that conduct research on racial issues. 

     

IDS 2935: Politics of Race at UF
  • Instructor: Sharon Austin, Political Science
  • Format: Online Synchronous
  • Gen Ed: Humanities, Diversity, 4000 Words
  • Syllabus
  • Description: Before the admissions of the first Black, Hispanic/Latino, Asian, international, and other students of color, the University of Florida practiced an unyielding form of racism that excluded these students.  After it desegregated, these students often encountered a very hostile and unwelcoming environment.  This course will discuss race relations in both the past and present by examining the theories and methodologies in research articles and books.  It is a multi-disciplinary course that will appeal to students of all majors at UF.  The class will discuss essential questions, write papers, complete an experiential oral history activity, and receive information about current campus units that conduct research on racial issues. 
IDS 2935: American Constitutionalism
  • InstructorPaul Gutierrez, Political Science
  • Format: 100% Classroom
  •  Gen Ed: Humanities
  • Syllabus
  • Description: How should we relate to the American Revolution, the U.S. Constitution, and the “Founding Fathers” today? Drawing on pedagogical practices from law, business, and graduate school, this course introduces students to competing accounts of the founding of the nation and the creation of its constitution.
IDS 2935: Humans-Oil-Plants-Energy?
  • Instructor: Emily Hind, Spanish and Portuguese Studies, Katerie Gladdys, Art and Art History
  • Format: 100% Classroom
  • Gen Ed: Humanities, Diversity, 4000 Words
  • Syllabus
  • Description: This class looks at the different ways that the arts, humanities, and sciences think about plants and oil. Students will challenge their preconceived notions that categorize plants as Nature and oil as Culture. This complex vision for environmental justice questions the contradictions of sustainability goals such as forest lovers who reject an asphalt bike path, or asphalt lovers who favor only vista-opening palm trees. Through introspection and reflection on our dependence on plants and oil, students will hone their personal energy ethic and become newly conscious plant-based petrocitizens in times of climate change. Skateboards optional. Curiosity required.
IDS 2935: Art and the Global Citizen
  • Instructor: Bethany Taylor, Art and Art History
  • Format: 100% Classroom
  • Gen Ed: Humanities, International
  • Syllabus
  • Description: Introduces the role of contemporary art as an engaged interdisciplinary practice, capable of empowering students to think through some of society’s most pressing concerns, and to question and reinvigorate a social, civic, and political imagination.
IDS 2935: Secrets of Alchemy
  • Instructor:  Alexander Angerhofer, Chemistry
  • Format: 100% Classroom
  • Class Numbers: 20158 and 20168 
  • Days and Periods: TR 7, Lab T 11-E1 or W 11-E1
  • Gen Ed: Humanities
  • Honors: Yes
  • Syllabus
  • Description: Alchemy is the pre-cursor to modern chemistry. It grew out of observations and experiments of early
    practitioners who were biased by their own worldviews and religious convictions. The course will give
    an overview of the various historic phases of Alchemy: Greek, Arabic, Eastern, Latin, its revival in the
    early modern period, and its psychologized rebirth in the modern era. Alchemy was part of ‘natural
    philosophy’ during a time when there was no clear distinction between science and religion. The course
    explores the worldviews and religious biases of its practitioners. It explores the methodologies, both
    theoretical and practical, used by alchemists. It will show alchemy to be part of the wider human
    endeavor to understand the world around us and to utilize it to advance culture. The accompanying lab
    portion will allow students to ‘see through the eyes of the alchemist’ natural processes as they happen
    in the lab.
IDS 2935: God, Humanity and Evolution
  • Instructor: Jonathan Edelmann, Religion
  • Format: Hybrid
  • Gen Ed: Humanities, 2000 Words
  • Syllabus
  • Description: This course examines the language that we use to talk about sciences and religions with a focus on Charles Darwin’s evolutionary theory. Through an examination of influential writings by scientists, philosophers, historians, and religious thinkers, this course shows the complex ways that evolutionary theory has been interpreted over time. It shows how the sciences have reshaped traditional religious views, the ways religion has reshaped the sciences, and the ways evolutionary theory impacts the portrayal of the future for natural and artificial intelligences. Students will have the opportunity to think and write about foundational concepts invigorated by the sciences and humanities. 
IDS 2935: God, Humanity and Evolution
  • Instructor: Jonathan Edelmann, Religion
  • Format: Hybrid
  • Gen Ed: Humanities, 2000 Words
  • Syllabus
  • Description: This course examines the language that we use to talk about sciences and religions with a focus on Charles Darwin’s evolutionary theory. Through an examination of influential writings by scientists, philosophers, historians, and religious thinkers, this course shows the complex ways that evolutionary theory has been interpreted over time. It shows how the sciences have reshaped traditional religious views, the ways religion has reshaped the sciences, and the ways evolutionary theory impacts the portrayal of the future for natural and artificial intelligences. Students will have the opportunity to think and write about foundational concepts invigorated by the sciences and humanities. 
IDS 2935: Places and Spaces
  • Instructor: John Maze, Architecture
  • Format: 100% Classroom
  • Gen Ed: Humanities, International
  • Syllabus
  • Description:Examines how the spaces and places in the built environment around the world shape our lives and express who we are and who we want to be. Students will explore the campus and participate in creative class activities.
IDS 2935: Shelter Development
  • InstructorJason von Meding, Construction Management
  • Format: 100% Classroom
  • Gen Ed: Humanities, International 
  • Syllabus
  • Description: This course explores the ongoing human endeavor to satisfy the basic need for shelter, considering the impact of this endeavor on the natural environment and the variety of solutions that we see around the world. We reflect on what the future might look like under various climate change (and maldevelopment) scenarios, and confront the systemic oppression that underpins today’s housing problems.
IDS 2935: Sounding the Alarm: Music and Social Engagement with the Environment
  • Instructor: Sarah Politz, Music
  • Format: 100% Classroom
  • Gen Ed: Humanities
  • Syllabus
  • Description: Sound is integral to the way we as humans engage with the world around us, from the soundworlds of animals and plants to those of human creativity and technology. In this course, we use music and sound as a way to understand the urgency of current issues in environmentalism and ecology. Using listening as an ethical practice, we will explore music from the popular to the experimental. We will seek to deepen our understanding of how we relate to the environment as ethical creatures and become more aware of the central place of sound and the environment in our lives. 
IDS 2935: Cultural Animals
  • Instructor: Jonathan Rick, Philosophy
  • Format: 100% Classroom
  • Gen Ed: Humanities, 2000 words
  • Syllabus
  • Description: Humans are cultural animals. On the one hand, we are biologically evolved animals - members of nature’s kingdom, bound by its universal laws or norms.  On the other hand, we are creatures of culture, variably shaped by the influences and innovations of our particular societies and communities.  Given our dual citizenship within these domains, questions and challenges emerge regarding the boundaries and allegiances between human nature and human culture.  These limits are especially urgent with respect to understanding the contours and content of morality. In Cultural Animals, we will examine the interplay between the ‘natural’ and the ‘cultural’ aspects of our lives, with particular emphasis on exploring how these often-coordinating, yet potentially-competing, forces serve to shape our moral practices both within the human community and beyond the human community - specifically with respect to our interactions with and treatment of nonhuman animals.
IDS 2935: Nature, Spirituality & Popular Culture
  • Instructor: Bron Taylor, Religion 
  • Format: Online Asynchronous
  •  Gen Ed: Humanities, International
  • Syllabus
  • Description: Examines the spiritual, ethical, and political dimensions of the arts (e.g. movies, music, photography), museums, theme parks, and other cultural productions, in which nature takes center stage. Moreover, we explore the international cultural tributaries, influences, and controversies such productions engender, for they constitute important ways that environmental ethics, and quests for environmentally sustainable livelihoods and lifeways.​
IDS 2935: Nature, Spirituality & Popular Culture
  • Instructor: Bron Taylor, Religion 
  • Format: Online Asynchronous
  •  Gen Ed: Humanities, International, 2000 words
  • Syllabus
  • Description: Examines the spiritual, ethical, and political dimensions of the arts (e.g. movies, music, photography), museums, theme parks, and other cultural productions, in which nature takes center stage. Moreover, we explore the international cultural tributaries, influences, and controversies such productions engender, for they constitute important ways that environmental ethics, and quests for environmentally sustainable livelihoods and lifeways.​
IDS 2935: War Games, United States & South Africa
  • Instructor: Mark Hodge, Art and Art History
  • Format: 100% Classroom
  • Gen Ed: Humanities, International
  • Syllabus
  • Description: Uses role-playing games to investigate conflict and its resolution by simulating the revolutionary chaos in New York (1775) and negotiations over a new constitution for post-apartheid South Africa (1993). Examines the role of the arts in remembering conflict, including Hamilton (2015), the Vietnam Veterans Memorial (1981), and contemporary monuments. We play two Reacting to the Past games where students are assigned a historically-based character and participate in a simulation of historical events and write papers in that role.
IDS 2935: The Horror, The Horror: Representations of War and Political Violence
  • InstructorEric Kligerman, Languages, Literatures and Cultures 
  • Fomat: 100% Classroom
  • Gen Ed: Humanities, International
  • Syllabus
  • Description: This course sets out to probe the cultural, social and political functions of horror in relation to shifting moments of historical violence. After reading and screening central works from the horror genre, we will examine some of the emblematic scenes of historical violence in the 20th and 21st centuries.
IDS 2935: Global Asia
  • Instructor: James Gerien-Chen, History
  • Format: 100% Classroom
  • Days and Periods: 14441 (M W 7, F 6); 14455 (M W 7, F 7); 14456 (M W 7, F 8)
  • Gen Ed: Humanites, International, 2000 Words
  • Syllabus
  • Description: This course traces the modern history and cultures of Asian migrations, from the seventeenth century to the present. Students will evaluate what a multidisciplinary approach to migration might contribute to current debates over migration and belonging, both in the United States and globally. In addition to offering an overview of large-scale patterns, the course encourages students to consider how these developments shaped individual lives and identities. To that end, students will engage with a broad range of historical sources, including autobiographies and memoirs, government reports, newspapers and other popular media, court cases, travel guides, and oral history interviews.
THE 1431: Autobiography in Literature & Performance
  • Instructor: Manuel Simons, Theater and Dance
  • Format: 100% Classroom
  • Gen Ed: Humanities, Diversity, 2000 words
  • Syllabus
  • Description: The course explores the ways in which modern and contemporary American artists and writers have utilized self-examination as the basis for artistic creation.  Often merging the factual with the theatrical or dramatic, autobiographical performance and literature personalizes the values, incidents and relationships that shape human experience and give life meaning.