Summer 2022 Quest 1 Courses

About UF Quest

UF Quest invites students to consider why the world is the way it is and what they can do about it. Students examine questions that are difficult to answer and hard to ignore in a world that is swiftly changing and becoming increasingly more complex. What makes life worth living? What makes a society a fair one? How do we manage conflicts? Who are we in relation to other people or to the natural world?

The UF Quest 1 Requirement

Quest 1 courses fulfill the UF Quest 1 requirement and 3 credits of the General Education requirement in the Humanities (see the UF Quest Requirement page for more information). Honors students are required to take an Honors Quest 1 course to complete the UF Quest 1 requirement. Some Quest 1 courses may also fulfill either the Diversity (D) or the International (N) requirement and/or count toward the Writing requirement. 

Quest 1 Courses

Click on the links below to learn more about the individual courses and to access course syllabi, which will be posted at least 3 days before the semester begins. Click the Campus, Honors, or UF Online button to filter by program or type in the search field to look for a particular subject, topic, instructor, etc.

For the day and periods that the classes meet, please consult the Schedule of Courses. A note is provided in One.UF for each Quest 1 and Quest 2 course so you can easily distinguish them.

Course Themes Culture Built Environment Literature Music Society Art Theater Dance
General Education Requirements Diversity International 2000 words 4000 words

Campus

IDS 2935: Conflict of Ideas
  • Instructor: Rodrigo Borges, Philosophy
  • Format: 100% Classroom
  • Gen Ed: Humanities, 2000 Words
  • Syllabus: Conflict of Ideas
  • Description: It’s been suggested that war is the continuation of politics by different means (or that politics was the continuation of war by other means). If war and politics are different ways in which we handle disagreement, then war and politics sit at different ends of the same spectrum. But, if the choice between the conflict of ideas and real conflict is so obvious (politics harm ideas, while wars harm real people), why do real conflicts keep happening? How can we understand what happens when people disagree—especially when they disagree about important or emotionally powerful issues? How can we resolve our disagreements in a principled fashion? Since the issues are important, we cannot just agree to disagree: we must learn how to have a fair fight. But how do we fight fair on the battleground of ideas?
IDS 2935: Ecological Urbanism before Columbus
  • Instructor: Timothy Murtha, Landscape Architecture
  • Format: 100% Classroom
  • Gen Ed: Humanities, International, 2000 Words
  • Syllabus: Ecological Urbanism before Columbus
  • Description: This interdisciplinary course investigates urbanism, sustainability, and resilience through the lens of ancient cities and landscapes across the Americas before European contact. Relying on methods of the humanities and humanistic anthropology, the course emphasizes two perspectives on landscape as narrative. First, our landscapes are our unintentional cultural and natural autobiography, reflecting history and agency. Second, how we perceive, portray, design, and represent landscape reflects our values and beliefs. The course will be offered through a weekly schedule of lectures, discussions, and independent activities.
IDS 2935: Places and Spaces
  • Instructor: John Maze, Architecture
  • Format: 100% Classroom
  • Gen Ed: Humanities, International
  • Syllabus: Places and Spaces
  • Description:Examines how the spaces and places in the built environment around the world shape our lives and express who we are and who we want to be. Students will explore the campus and participate in creative class activities.
IDS 2935: Politics of Race at UF
  • Instructor: Sharon Austin, Political Science
  • Format: 100% Online (Asynchronous)
  • Gen Ed: Humanities, Diversity, 4000 Words 
  • Syllabus: Politics of Race at UF
  • Description: Before the admissions of the first Black, Hispanic/Latino, Asian, international, and other students of color, the University of Florida practiced an unyielding form of racism that excluded these students.  After it desegregated, these students often encountered a very hostile and unwelcoming environment.  This course will discuss race relations in both the past and present by examining the theories and methodologies in research articles and books.  It is a multi-disciplinary course that will appeal to students of all majors at UF.  The class will discuss essential questions, write papers, complete an experiential oral history activity, and receive information about current campus units that conduct research on racial issues. 

     

IDS 2935: Speaking Truth to Power
  • Instructor: Angela Walther, University Writing Program
  • Format: 100% Classroom
  • Gen Ed: Humanities, Diversity, 2000 Words
  • Syllabus:
  • Description: This course explores the symbols used in contemporary protest movements and compares these strategies for reform to traditional methods of advocacy. By observing, participating in, and researching communication in protest and advocacy, we will consider what civic participation means for and to each of us.
IDS 2935: The Horror, The Horror: Representations of War and Political Violence
  • InstructorEric Kligerman, Languages, Literatures and Cultures 
  • Fomat: 100% Classroom
  • Gen Ed: Humanities, International
  • Syllabus: The Horror, The Horror
  • Description: This course sets out to probe the cultural, social and political functions of horror in relation to shifting moments of historical violence. After reading and screening central works from the horror genre, we will examine some of the emblematic scenes of historical violence in the 20th and 21st centuries.
IDS 2935: The Long Civil Rights Movement
  • InstructorLauren Pearlman, History
  • Format: Partially Online and Partially in the Classroom
  • Gen Ed: Humanities, Diversity, 2000 Words
  • Syllabus: The Long Civil Rights Movement
  • Description: Examines the development of one of America’s most defining social justice movements, the civil rights movement, focusing on the citizens who had the courage to imagine a more just society and the skilled activists who helped them organize to transform it.​
IDS 2935: War Games, United States & South Africa
  • Instructor: Mark Hodge, Art and Art History
  • Format: 100% Classroom
  • Gen Ed: Humanities, International
  • Syllabus: War Games, United States & South Africa
  • Description: Uses role-playing games to investigate conflict and its resolution by simulating the revolutionary chaos in New York (1775–76) and negotiations over a new constitution for post-apartheid South Africa (1993). Examines the role of the arts in remembering conflict, focusing on the controversy over the Vietnam Veterans Memorial (1981).
IDS 2935: Women Changing Society Through Music
  • Instructor: Danielle VanTuinen, Music
  • Format: 100% Classroom
  • Gen Ed: Humanities
  • Syllabus: Women Changing Society Through Music
  • Description: How have women expressed their agency, authorship, worldview, and their power through their contribution to various movements in music and how have women transformed the production and consumption of music? In this course we will explore how women throughout history have used music to create a path for the future generations in combination with how feminism acted as a mode for delivery into the public eye.

Honors

IDS 2935: The Horror, The Horror: Representations of War and Political Violence
  • InstructorEric Kligerman, Languages, Literatures and Cultures 
  • Fomat: 100% Classroom
  • Gen Ed: Humanities, International
  • Syllabus: The Horror, The Horror
  • Description: This course sets out to probe the cultural, social and political functions of horror in relation to shifting moments of historical violence. After reading and screening central works from the horror genre, we will examine some of the emblematic scenes of historical violence in the 20th and 21st centuries.
IDS 2935: The Long Civil Rights Movement
  • InstructorLauren Pearlman, History
  • Format: Partially Online and Partially in the Classroom
  • Gen Ed: Humanities, Diversity, 2000 Words
  • Syllabus: The Long Civil Rights Movement
  • Description: Examines the development of one of America’s most defining social justice movements, the civil rights movement, focusing on the citizens who had the courage to imagine a more just society and the skilled activists who helped them organize to transform it.​

UF Online

IDS 1161: What is the Good Life?
  • Format: 100% Online (Asynchronous)
  • Gen Ed: Humanities
  • Syllabus: Schultz
  • Description: Drawing on the disciplines that make up the Humanities, this course investigates the very nature of the human condition. Students examine the ways different people from different societies across time conceptualize the good life, the meaning and value individuals ascribe to the lives that they live or want to live, and the choices, costs, and benefits of the good life.
IDS 2935: Conflict of Ideas
  • Instructor: Rodrigo Borges, Philosophy
  • Format: 100% Classroom
  • Gen Ed: Humanities, 2000 Words
  • Syllabus: Conflict of Ideas
  • Description: It’s been suggested that war is the continuation of politics by different means (or that politics was the continuation of war by other means). If war and politics are different ways in which we handle disagreement, then war and politics sit at different ends of the same spectrum. But, if the choice between the conflict of ideas and real conflict is so obvious (politics harm ideas, while wars harm real people), why do real conflicts keep happening? How can we understand what happens when people disagree—especially when they disagree about important or emotionally powerful issues? How can we resolve our disagreements in a principled fashion? Since the issues are important, we cannot just agree to disagree: we must learn how to have a fair fight. But how do we fight fair on the battleground of ideas?
IDS 2935: Places and Spaces
  • Instructor: John Maze, Architecture
  • Format: 100% Classroom
  • Gen Ed: Humanities, International
  • Syllabus: Places and Spaces
  • Description:Examines how the spaces and places in the built environment around the world shape our lives and express who we are and who we want to be. Students will explore the campus and participate in creative class activities.
IDS 2935: The Horror, The Horror: Representations of War and Political Violence
  • InstructorEric Kligerman, Languages, Literatures and Cultures 
  • Fomat: 100% Classroom
  • Gen Ed: Humanities, International
  • Syllabus: The Horror, The Horror
  • Description: This course sets out to probe the cultural, social and political functions of horror in relation to shifting moments of historical violence. After reading and screening central works from the horror genre, we will examine some of the emblematic scenes of historical violence in the 20th and 21st centuries.
IDS 1161: What is the Good Life?
  • Format: 100% Online (Asynchronous)
  • Gen Ed: Humanities
  • Syllabus: Schultz
  • Description: Drawing on the disciplines that make up the Humanities, this course investigates the very nature of the human condition. Students examine the ways different people from different societies across time conceptualize the good life, the meaning and value individuals ascribe to the lives that they live or want to live, and the choices, costs, and benefits of the good life.
IDS 2935: Women Changing Society Through Music
  • Instructor: Danielle VanTuinen, Music
  • Format: 100% Classroom
  • Gen Ed: Humanities
  • Syllabus: Women Changing Society Through Music
  • Description: How have women expressed their agency, authorship, worldview, and their power through their contribution to various movements in music and how have women transformed the production and consumption of music? In this course we will explore how women throughout history have used music to create a path for the future generations in combination with how feminism acted as a mode for delivery into the public eye.
IDS 2935: Politics of Race at UF
  • Instructor: Sharon Austin, Political Science
  • Format: 100% Online (Asynchronous)
  • Gen Ed: Humanities, Diversity, 4000 Words 
  • Syllabus: Politics of Race at UF
  • Description: Before the admissions of the first Black, Hispanic/Latino, Asian, international, and other students of color, the University of Florida practiced an unyielding form of racism that excluded these students.  After it desegregated, these students often encountered a very hostile and unwelcoming environment.  This course will discuss race relations in both the past and present by examining the theories and methodologies in research articles and books.  It is a multi-disciplinary course that will appeal to students of all majors at UF.  The class will discuss essential questions, write papers, complete an experiential oral history activity, and receive information about current campus units that conduct research on racial issues. 

     

IDS 2935: Speaking Truth to Power
  • Instructor: Angela Walther, University Writing Program
  • Format: 100% Classroom
  • Gen Ed: Humanities, Diversity, 2000 Words
  • Syllabus:
  • Description: This course explores the symbols used in contemporary protest movements and compares these strategies for reform to traditional methods of advocacy. By observing, participating in, and researching communication in protest and advocacy, we will consider what civic participation means for and to each of us.
IDS 2935: Ecological Urbanism before Columbus
  • Instructor: Timothy Murtha, Landscape Architecture
  • Format: 100% Classroom
  • Gen Ed: Humanities, International, 2000 Words
  • Syllabus: Ecological Urbanism before Columbus
  • Description: This interdisciplinary course investigates urbanism, sustainability, and resilience through the lens of ancient cities and landscapes across the Americas before European contact. Relying on methods of the humanities and humanistic anthropology, the course emphasizes two perspectives on landscape as narrative. First, our landscapes are our unintentional cultural and natural autobiography, reflecting history and agency. Second, how we perceive, portray, design, and represent landscape reflects our values and beliefs. The course will be offered through a weekly schedule of lectures, discussions, and independent activities.
IDS 2935: War Games, United States & South Africa
  • Instructor: Mark Hodge, Art and Art History
  • Format: 100% Classroom
  • Gen Ed: Humanities, International
  • Syllabus: War Games, United States & South Africa
  • Description: Uses role-playing games to investigate conflict and its resolution by simulating the revolutionary chaos in New York (1775–76) and negotiations over a new constitution for post-apartheid South Africa (1993). Examines the role of the arts in remembering conflict, focusing on the controversy over the Vietnam Veterans Memorial (1981).
IDS 2935: The Long Civil Rights Movement
  • InstructorLauren Pearlman, History
  • Format: Partially Online and Partially in the Classroom
  • Gen Ed: Humanities, Diversity, 2000 Words
  • Syllabus: The Long Civil Rights Movement
  • Description: Examines the development of one of America’s most defining social justice movements, the civil rights movement, focusing on the citizens who had the courage to imagine a more just society and the skilled activists who helped them organize to transform it.​
IDS 2935: The Horror, The Horror: Representations of War and Political Violence
  • InstructorEric Kligerman, Languages, Literatures and Cultures 
  • Fomat: 100% Classroom
  • Gen Ed: Humanities, International
  • Syllabus: The Horror, The Horror
  • Description: This course sets out to probe the cultural, social and political functions of horror in relation to shifting moments of historical violence. After reading and screening central works from the horror genre, we will examine some of the emblematic scenes of historical violence in the 20th and 21st centuries.
IDS 2935: The Long Civil Rights Movement
  • InstructorLauren Pearlman, History
  • Format: Partially Online and Partially in the Classroom
  • Gen Ed: Humanities, Diversity, 2000 Words
  • Syllabus: The Long Civil Rights Movement
  • Description: Examines the development of one of America’s most defining social justice movements, the civil rights movement, focusing on the citizens who had the courage to imagine a more just society and the skilled activists who helped them organize to transform it.​